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Internal Communications: Drive Your Small Business PR and Marketing Plan with Brand Ambassadors.

How many times has this happened to you? You place a call to a company, to ask for a little more detail about a promotion on their Web site.

But the customer service representative that answers your query is clueless about the additional detail- and the promotion.

Who is responsible for your internal communications marketing and public relations plan?

This isn’t the fault of the CSR-they only know what they know. Your employees should be your brand ambassadors- well versed in company promotions and events, eager to talk about them, and fully able to answer customer questions.

If you have dedicated small business marketing and public relations personnel, internal communications falls into their lap. If you’re operating on a shoestring, then you need to get the ball rolling.

Key points of an effective small business PR and internal communications plan:

  • If you’ve purchased small business marketing materials, like brochures or direct mail, make sure that all of your brand ambassadors have copies well ahead of public release.

  • Take the time during your weekly staff meeting to highlight your internal communications plan. Encourage questions and make sure your employees understand your small business marketing and public relations plan.

  • If you use the Web, an e-mail campaign or blogs for small business PR, tell your employees where to find them, and then cc them on updates.

  • Over-communicate your internal communications plan. Do all of the things listed here, and do them more than once.

Finally, test the effectiveness of your internal communications plan by calling your company and asking your brand ambassadors questions about a current promotion. If your employees know your voice, ask a friend or family member to make the call instead.

Post your favorite ideas for small business marketing strategy.

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